Archive for December, 2013
cell phone privacy

Our mobile devices are becoming and extensions of ourselves.  According to research by research by Morgan Stanley, mobile transactions is set to explode in the few years (2014 UP).  This is due to the rise of mobile technology which will overtake the desktop in 2014.  Even as I write this.. I know that these words are already becoming obsolete.   But the time you read this it will have already happened.

It is more important than ever to protect our data and privacy on our mobile devices.  Here are a few tips on how you can.

cell phone privacy

cell phone privacy

1. Remove the Subscriber Identity Module/ SIM card –  The SIM card does not store photos, address information (not yet anyway).  But it does contain information needed to access your cell network data.  As well as text messages, phone contacts with related information like names and numbers and addresses you attached to your contacts, history of calls (dates and times).  It can also contain important data regarding your location.  All of this vital information makes it great for police investigations and forensics, but can also be used to get information that you believe should be private.  

vital to cell phone privacy

a pic of cell phone sim slot

With your subscriber identity module (SIM), anyone can can get your information even without your phone.  They can plug it into the applicable phone and access your data as if they are you.  If you truly want to make sure no one gets transactions that you have made on your mobile device, you should take out the SIM card.  If your data is truly valuable (more valuable than your phone), then take out the SIM and put it in your wallet.  Lastly, the SIM itself has a PIN code you can put in.

for privacy use passcode

use cell phone privacy lock screen-pin

2.  Phone security code – Whether its Android Screen Lock or iPhone Passcode, this should be a “no brainer” but is so easy to NOT do because you don’t want to go through the hassle of tapping the PIN code while driving (which you should NEVER do).  But just imagine leaving your cell phone somewhere then suddenly realizing that not ONLY have you lost your phone, but that phone has direct access into your email account and the phone has NO security code.  Create a phone security code to prevent anyone from spying your phone.  

cell phone privacy history martin cooper

cell phone privacy history martin cooper

3. Delete history – Do you really NEED your history?  Someone else might, so its best to clean it up often.  Delete call logs, SMS logs, SKYPE logs, oovoo, viber, imessage, snapchat, every like of log you can think of.  Delete old pictures, emails everything.  If you don’t need it, delete it.  In fact, if you can, turn off the history so it does not store anything.  

cell phone privacy and pattern-lock

cell phone privacy and pattern-lock

4. No automatic email log in – I know its convenient, but if you don’t have constant control over your phone, its best NOT to allow it to automatically access your accounts.  If you MUST have automatic access, make sure you have Auto Lock on your screen and a passcode.  

5.  Auto-Lock/Screen Lock –  Pin codes, passcodes and screen locks are not as effective if you don’t have your phone automatically lock after a certain number of minutes.  I suggest 5 minutes.  But its up to you.

lloyds message service – debit posted.zip (malware)

If you got lloyds message service – debit posted in an email then its a virus.  This .zip is malware verified by VirusTotal.com

lloyds message service

courtesy of tranquilnet

Subject: You have received a new debit

This is an automatically generated email by the Lloyds TSB PLC

LloydsLink online payments Service to inform you that you have

receive a NEW Payment.

The details of the payment are attached.

This e-mail (including any attachments) is private and confidential

and may contain privileged material. If you have received this

 

Scan From VirusTotal:

Antivirus

Result

Update

Ad-Aware

20131211

Agnitum

20131217

AhnLab-V3

Trojan/Win32.Dapato

20131218

AntiVir

20131218

Antiy-AVL

20131218

Avast

Win32:Malware-gen

20131218

AVG

20131218

Baidu-International

20131213

BitDefender

20131211

Bkav

20131218

ByteHero

20130613

CAT-QuickHeal

20131218

ClamAV

20131218

CMC

20131217

Commtouch

W32/Trojan.CIRP-9141

20131218

Comodo

20131218

DrWeb

20131218

Emsisoft

20131218

ESET-NOD32

Win32/TrojanDownloader.Waski.A

20131218

F-Prot

W32/Trojan3.GVD

20131218

F-Secure

Trojan.Agent.BBBY

20131218

Fortinet

20131218

GData

Trojan.Agent.BBBY

20131218

Ikarus

Trojan-Spy.Agent

20131218

Jiangmin

20131218

K7AntiVirus

20131218

K7GW

20131218

Kaspersky

Trojan.Win32.Bublik.boha

20131218

Kingsoft

20130829

Malwarebytes

Trojan.Agent.RV

20131218

McAfee

20131218

McAfee-GW-Edition

20131218

Microsoft

20131218

MicroWorld-eScan

20131218

NANO-Antivirus

20131218

Norman

20131218

nProtect

20131218

Panda

20131218

Rising

PE:Malware.FakePDF@CV!1.9E18

20131218

Sophos

Troj/Zbot-HEQ

20131218

SUPERAntiSpyware

20131218

Symantec

20131218

TheHacker

20131217

TotalDefense

20131217

TrendMicro

20131218

TrendMicro-HouseCall

TROJ_GEN.F47V1218

20131218

VBA32

20131218

VIPRE

20131218

ViRobot

20131218